January 27, 2023

What diabetes is revealing about the benefits and risks of personal medicine connected to the internet – CNBC

A blood glucose control system with the help of a smartphone and a meter that is fixed to the skin.

Ute Grabowsky | Photothek | Getty Images

The internet of things to remote monitor and manage common health issues has been growing steadily, led by diabetes patients.

About one out of every 10 Americans, or 37 million people, are living with diabetes. Devices such as insulin pumps, which go back decades, and continuous glucose monitors, which monitor blood sugar levels 24/7, a…….

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A blood glucose control system with the help of a smartphone and a meter that is fixed to the skin.

Ute Grabowsky | Photothek | Getty Images

The internet of things to remote monitor and manage common health issues has been growing steadily, led by diabetes patients.

About one out of every 10 Americans, or 37 million people, are living with diabetes. Devices such as insulin pumps, which go back decades, and continuous glucose monitors, which monitor blood sugar levels 24/7, are increasingly connected to smartphones via Bluetooth. The increased connectivity comes with many benefits. People with type 1 diabetes can have much tighter control over their blood sugar levels because they’re able to review weeks of blood sugar and insulin dosing data, making it easier to spot trends and fine-tune dosing. In recent years, diabetes patient became so adept at remote monitoring that a DIY community of patient-hackers manipulated devices to better manage their medical needs, and the medical device industry has learned from them.

But the ability to monitor medical conditions over the internet comes with risks, including nefarious hacking. Though medical devices, which must go through FDA approval, meet a higher standard than fitness devices, there are still risks to protecting patient data and access to the device itself. The FDA has issued periodic warnings about the vulnerability of medical devices such as insulin pumps to hackers, and product makers have issued recalls related to vulnerabilities. In September, that occurred with Medtronic‘s MiniMed 600 Series insulin pump, which the company and FDA warned had a potential issue that could allow unauthorized access, creating a risk that the pump could deliver too much or not enough insulin.

Sleep apnea, Type 2 diabetes and remote health care

It’s not just diabetes where the medical device market is offering patients new benefits from remote monitoring. For sleep apnea, which is estimated to affect as many as 30 million Americans (and one billion people globally) C-PAP machines can now store and send data to health-care providers without needing an office visit. 

The number of internet-connected medical devices grew during the pandemic, as lockdowns created a big push to treat people at home. As virtual care visits rose, “it opened everybody’s eyes to home-based medical devices for remote patient monitoring,” said Gregg Pessin, a senior director of research at Gartner.

Steady sales of continuous glucose monitors and insulin pumps have buoyed companies such as Dexcom, <span …….

Source: https://news.google.com/__i/rss/rd/articles/CBMiamh0dHBzOi8vd3d3LmNuYmMuY29tLzIwMjMvMDEvMjEvdGhlLWJlbmVmaXRzLWFuZC1yaXNrcy1vZi1wZXJzb25hbC1tZWRpY2FsLW1vbml0b3Jpbmctb24tdGhlLWludGVybmV0Lmh0bWzSAW5odHRwczovL3d3dy5jbmJjLmNvbS9hbXAvMjAyMy8wMS8yMS90aGUtYmVuZWZpdHMtYW5kLXJpc2tzLW9mLXBlcnNvbmFsLW1lZGljYWwtbW9uaXRvcmluZy1vbi10aGUtaW50ZXJuZXQuaHRtbA?oc=5