January 27, 2023

Diabetes Medications Linked to Multiple Sclerosis: New Study Uncovers Surprising Connection – SciTechDaily

Anti-hyperglycemic medications are used to lower blood sugar levels in people with high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia. These medications can be used to treat conditions such as diabetes, prediabetes, and gestational diabetes. They work by decreasing the amount of sugar produced by the liver, increasing the sensitivity of muscle and fat cells to insulin, or helping the body use sugar more effectively.

The University of Arizona Cent…….

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Anti-hyperglycemic medications are used to lower blood sugar levels in people with high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia. These medications can be used to treat conditions such as diabetes, prediabetes, and gestational diabetes. They work by decreasing the amount of sugar produced by the liver, increasing the sensitivity of muscle and fat cells to insulin, or helping the body use sugar more effectively.

The University of Arizona Center for Innovation in Brain Science conducted a study to investigate whether taking medication for Type 2 diabetes increases the likelihood of developing multiple sclerosis.

According to a study from the University of Arizona Health Sciences, people over the age of 45 with Type 2 diabetes who were treated with anti-hyperglycemic medications had a higher risk of developing multiple sclerosis, particularly among women. However, the study also found that in people under the age of 45, anti-hyperglycemic exposure actually reduced the risk of multiple sclerosis.

“Our findings reinforce the need for a precision medicine approach to preventing MS in these vulnerable populations,” said lead researcher Kathleen Rodgers, Ph.D., associate director of translational neuroscience at the Center for Innovation in Brain Science.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an unpredictable autoimmune neurological disorder that affects the central nervous system and leads to severe physical and cognitive disability. It is estimated that nearly 1 million adults in the U.S. and more than 2.8 million worldwide are living with MS.

For people with Type 2 diabetes, there is mounting evidence linking metabolic disorders and MS through a common driver of increased autoimmunity. This brings into question the impact of anti-hyperglycemic therapeutics used to treat Type 2 diabetes, including insulin, on the incidence of MS.

“Previous research has shown a neuroprotective effect of anti-hyperglycemic medications in Alzheimer’s disease and other related dementias,” Dr. Rodgers said. “For MS, we wanted to further examine age and sex differences, particularly among men and women under 45 with Type 2 diabetes.”

They found that men older than 45 years old had a slightly significant increase of MS risk and women older than 45 years exhibited a significant increase in MS incidence after anti-hyperglycemic exposure. In addition to age differences, the risk analysis by drug class showed that exposure to insulin in patients older than 45 years old was associated …….

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